Retro USB Improvements

Some good news for Retro USB this week: new hardware, international keyboard improvements, and an enclosure prototype! Everything is maturing nicely, thanks to feedback and assistance from some helpful early adopters. More hardware is available, if you haven’t yet gotten yours. Forward ho!

For anybody who’s newly tuning in, Retro USB is an input converter for USB and ADB keyboards and mice. It works in two directions, connecting modern USB peripherals to a classic ADB-based Macintosh or Apple IIgs computer, or ADB peripherals to a USB-based computer running Windows, OSX, or Linux.

 
Board Version 1.2

After a slightly bumpy start, I’ve finally perfected the PCB design with version 1.2. This is the first version whose assembly won’t require me to apply manual fix-ups for my design mistakes, so the assembly process can be simpler and faster. It doesn’t make any difference to the final product, but hand-soldering patch wires and extra resistors is tiresome work. I’m very glad to be rid of that job.

The most significant change in board version 1.2 is the addition of a 1000 uF bulk capacitor for the USB power supply. This enables Retro USB to handle brief spikes in power demand from attached devices, such as the spikes from an Apple A1243 keyboard during its initialization. With this capacitor, there are no problems with “spiky” USB devices like the A1243. The built-in hub on the A1243 works too, and is a convenient spot to attach the mouse.

A bulk capacitor can be retrofit to board versions 1.0 and 1.1, if you’re comfortable with some basic soldering. You’ll need a capacitor of 680 uF or more, with a voltage rating of 6.0 volts or more, like this example. Solder the capacitor’s negative terminal to the board’s GND and the capacitor’s positive terminal to the board’s VUSB. See the photos for the board locations to use.

 
International Keyboards

Firmware version 0.1.15 resolves a few remaining issues for non-US keyboards, and layouts from French to Danish to Estonian and everything in between should now be working, in both USB-to-ADB and ADB-to-USB directions. Please see the International Keyboards section on the main Retro USB page for important details.

For correct key mapping with non-US keyboards:

  • Choose the appropriate keyboard type in your operating system’s keyboard control panel or language preferences
  • Set Retro USB to ISO mode (automatic for many keyboard models)

For many countries outside the USA, the USB keyboards designed for Windows PCs have a different layout than Apple keyboards. These PC-type USB keyboards may be used, but key mappings for some symbols will be incorrect where differences exist between the Apple and PC-type layouts. Best results will be obtained with Apple-brand non-US keyboards, or any brand US-layout keyboards.

 
Other Firmware Improvements

See the change notes included with the latest firmware for a complete list of what’s new. Here are the highlights:

  • Right mouse button now works on NeXT computers
  • Resolved an issue that prevented ADB keyboard capslock from functioning with macOS Sierra
  • Fixed the output from help commands to appear correctly when using a non-QWERTY keyboard
  • Fixed missed ADB keyboard events if the mouse is moved while typing
  • Fixed device initialization when using multiple cascaded USB hubs
  • Added new help command Control-Shift-Capslock-G to show the current keymap type

 
Enclosure Prototype

I’m working on a simple enclosure to protect the Retro USB board and add a touch of style. It’s gloss black 1.5 mm acrylic with an engraved logo, and cut to the same shape as the PCB. Add a few spacers and screws, and it makes a nice little package that’s easy to assemble. Initially I’d planned to make a fully-enclosed 6-sided box, but I would have needed to lose the rounded corners, and my experience with the Floppy Emu enclosure has taught me that 6-sided laser-cut enclosures can be awkward to put together. I quite like the appearance and simplicity of this enclosure, and it will probably show up in the store soon.

 
What’s Next?

Although the start was a little chaotic, Retro USB’s software and hardware now are both looking good, and the device can truly deliver on its plug-and-go promise for ADB and USB conversion. On the software side I’ll be looking at multi-button mouse support soon, so stay tuned for that. For the hardware, most of the effort will go into improving the assembly and testing process, and transitioning away from hand assembly. After that, we will see what else takes shape!


This post was originally published on this site.